IOA Position Papers

Is Nigeria’s consumer class stimulating FDI? A critical analysis of emergent economic influence.

By Carla Sterley[1]

IOA analysis in brief | As Nigeria’s middle class has developed, opportunities for growth in the country’s consumer sector have emerged. This has sparked the interest of Multinational Corporations (MNCs) looking for investment opportunities in Africa, allowing for Nigeria to open their economy to international players.

Key points:

  • Nigeria’s consumer class is expanding, resulting in a rise in consumption of consumer goods
  • Increased consumption means that opportunities for investment by global players in the retail industry have increased
  • This economic influence has both positive and negative implications for the population’s financial future

Nigeria’s middle class is influencing the country’s international economic outlook, allowing for increased foreign direct investment (FDI) opportunities in the consumer industry.  The West African country, which is one of Africa’s fastest growing economies, is home to a growing middle class – a consequence of a strong economy, high rate of urbanisation and the growth of educated professionals earning competitive salaries. This development has resulted in a middle class economic outlook and the transformation of a demand-driven economy. This is especially evident in the consumables and electronics sectors of the state’s economy. Demand for goods has stimulated interest from foreign investors, generating additional FDI.

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How autonomous trains will drive African railway

When Africa's first high-speed rail system begins service in Morocco in 2018, travel time from Tangier to Casablanca will be cut in half, from five hours to 2 hrs 10 min. Here an engine is being loaded onto a customised truck for transport to the railroad. Africa is constantly improving its rail systems, and autonomous trains will be the next essential innovation. Image courtesy: Morocco World News https://www.moroccoworldnews.com/2015/07/162167/in-pictures-moroccos-tgv-africas-first-high-speed-train/

When Africa’s first high-speed rail system begins service in Morocco in 2018, travel time from Tangier to Casablanca will be cut in half, from five hours to 2 hrs 10 min. Here an engine is being loaded onto a customised truck for transport to the railroad. Africa is constantly improving its rail systems, and autonomous trains will be the next essential innovation. Image courtesy: Morocco World News. Available from: https://tinyurl.com/hukpyqw

While upgrading national systems with an eye at a unified continental system, African railways won’t be left behind in the next technological leap toward self-driving transportation.

 

IOA analysis in briefTrains will drive themselves across Africa’s terrain in the near future, with the technology available today to make autonomous engines that are safer, more efficient, reliable and environmentally friendly than the human-driven type. If Africa’s rail systems do not adapt to the new technology, they will become extinct in a new age of self-driving long haul truck transportation.

Key points:

  • Autonomous trains are a reality today, but require massive spending on new technology
  • Most African railroads are owned by governments or linked to governments, which hinders adaptability and innovation
  • Africa is dedicated to its rail system, with 11,000 km of new line now being built at a cost of US$ 30 billion

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Community engagement and capacity-building in protection: United Nations peacekeeping during African conflicts

Civilians are the primary agents in their own protection, and international actors have only recently begun to support civilian self-protection efforts. Engaging locals in their own protection, however, does not come without challenges. 

Written by Leigh Hamilton

The protection of civilians during conflicts is one of the UN’s most significant undertakings. While the humanitarian branches of the organisation perform protection activities, it is mostly UN peacekeepers who act to prevent or respond to threats of physical violence against civilians. The UN Security Council first authorised peacekeepers to use force to protect civilians in 1999 during the United Nations Mission in Sierra Leone (UNAMSIL). Since then, the UN has launched 17 peacekeeping missions, the majority of which have been mandated to protect civilians. Some missions, such as the United Nations Multidimensional Integrated Stabilisation Mission in the Central African Republic (MINUSCA) and the United Nations Mission in the Republic of South Sudan (UNMISS), have mandates that make the protection of civilians the mission’s chief priority. Read more

How autonomous trains will drive African railway

When Africa's first high-speed rail system begins service in Morocco in 2018, travel time from Tangier to Casablanca will be cut in half, from five hours to 2 hrs 10 min. Here an engine is being loaded onto a customised truck for transport to the railroad. Africa is constantly improving its rail systems, and autonomous trains will be the next essential innovation. Image courtesy: Morocco World News https://www.moroccoworldnews.com/2015/07/162167/in-pictures-moroccos-tgv-africas-first-high-speed-train/

When Africa’s first high-speed rail system begins service in Morocco in 2018, travel time from Tangier to Casablanca will be cut in half, from five hours to 2 hrs 10 min. Here an engine is being loaded onto a customised truck for transport to the railroad. Africa is constantly improving its rail systems, and autonomous trains will be the next essential innovation. Image courtesy: Morocco World News. Available from: https://tinyurl.com/hukpyqw

While upgrading national systems with an eye at a unified continental system, African railways won’t be left behind in the next technological leap toward self-driving transportation.

 

IOA analysis in brief | How autonomous trains will drive African railways

Trains will drive themselves across Africa’s terrain in the near future, with the technology available today to make autonomous engines that are safer, more efficient, reliable and environmentally friendly than the human-driven type. If Africa’s rail systems do not adapt to the new technology, they will become extinct in a new age of self-driving long haul truck transportation.

 Key points:

  • Autonomous trains are a reality today, but require massive spending on new technology
  • Most African railroads are owned by governments or linked to governments, which hinders adaptability and innovation
  • Africa is dedicated to its rail system, with 11,000 km of new line now being built at a cost of US$ 30 billion

Read more

Brightening Africa’s Prospects

Striving towards universal energy access across the continent

As a growing continent, a key objective for Africa to stimulate development is stable and sustainable power access. At present, there are still over 600 million Africans that do not have access to electricity. Addressing this challenge is at the forefront of triggering economic growth and social benefit

IOA’s latest special report seeks to assess the current state of energy in Africa, as well as unpack the various opportunities that implementing greater renewable solutions holds for the continent.